Which CT findings are characteristic of endobronchial hamartomas?

HomeWhich CT findings are characteristic of endobronchial hamartomas?
Which CT findings are characteristic of endobronchial hamartomas?

Superficial endobronchial lung cancer may be defined as ‘a tumor of any size with its invasive component limited to the bronchial wall and perhaps extending to the proximal bronchus’, and is also classified as T1 at TNM staging (1).

Q. What is a endobronchial lesion?

Endobronchial lesions, particularly tumors, are among the less common etiology for pulmonary nodules, and include such conditions as carcinoid tumors and minor salivary gland neoplasms, as well as a host of other mesenchymal neoplasms, both benign and malignant, that may arise from the epithelium, submucosa, or wall of …

Q. What is endobronchial lung cancer?

Superficial endobronchial lung cancer may be defined as ‘a tumor of any size with its invasive component limited to the bronchial wall and perhaps extending to the proximal bronchus’, and is also classified as T1 at TNM staging (1).

Most patients with endobronchial tumors present with symptoms related to cough, chest pain, wheezing, hemoptysis, recurrent pneumonia and weight loss.

Q. Where is endobronchial?

An endobronchial valve (EBV), is a small, one-way valve, which may be implanted in an airway feeding the lung or part of lung. The valve allows air to be breathed out of the section of lung supplied, and prevents air from being breathed in.

Q. How do you perform an endobronchial biopsy?

A small incision is made in the neck just above the breastbone or next to the breastbone. Next, a thin scope, called a mediastinoscope, is inserted through the opening to provide access to the lungs and surrounding lymph nodes. Tissue or fluid is then collected via biopsy.

Q. What are the signs of endobronchial tumor?

Endobronchial Tumor 1 Air crescent around lesion should suggest endobronchial lesion (also seen with intracavitary lesions) 2 Bronchus sign: Bronchus leading to peripheral nodule 3 Lesions have variable density, may contain fat or calcium or low-attenuation material from necrosis

Q. What is an endobronchial mass lesion?

Endobronchial mass lesion may be an incidental finding of chest imaging or it may present with symptoms of dyspnea, cough, or hemoptysis. We present a case of an endobronchial mass lesion in a patient with renal cell carcinoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which was incidentally detected on chest imaging.

Q. What is endobronchial glomus tumor?

Glomus tumor is a rare, predominantly benign, soft tissue tumor. The lower respiratory tract is an uncommon site of origin of glomus tumor, so endobronchial glomus tumor is extremely rare. Such tumors are mostly benign and identified incidentally on imaging.

Contrast-enhanced CT scan shows calcified endobronchial mass (arrow) with fibrous cap in bronchus intermedius. Intrapulmonary and endobronchial hamartomas contain cartilage, fat, fibrous tissue, and an epithelial component. It is reported, however, that endobronchial lesions tend to have relatively more fat than do parenchymal lesions.

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